The global building floor area is expected to double by 2060. Buildings and construction are therefore essential sectors to fight climate change and reach development objectives. Already today, the construction and operation of buildings is responsible for 40% of all energy-related carbon dioxide emissions and consumes 36% of the global final energy.

The Programme for Energy Efficiency in Buildings (PEEB) aims to significantly transform the building sector by promoting sustainable building design and construction. PEEB combines financing for energy efficiency in large-scale projects with technical assistance through policy advice and expertise for building sector professionals.

TRANSFORMING THE
BUILDING SECTOR.

 

PEEB is catalysed by the Global Alliance for Buildings and Construction (GABC). The Programme supports the implementation of the GABC roadmap “Towards low GHG and resilient buildings” and its goal to limit global warming to well below 2°C and moving towards the 1.5°C limit.

PEEB was initiated by the governments of France and Germany at COP22, and combines the expertise of its implementing agencies Agence Française de Développement (AFD), Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), and Agence de l’Environnement et de la Maitrise de l’Energie (ADEME). PEEB is working with its first five partner countries Mexico, Morocco, Senegal, Tunisia and Vietnam.

OBJECTIVES

  • Transform the buildings sector by promoting sustainable building design and construction.
  • Lower the energy demand in buildings in a cost-effective manner and reduce greenhouse gas emissions to a minimum level
  • Leverage untapped social, ecological and economic benefits
Impacts & Benefits

The reasons to act

Transforming the building sector is essential to fight climate change. The global building floor area is expected to double by 2060. Most new buildings are being constructed in warmer and tropical climates with a high need for cooling. The construction and operation of buildings is responsible for 40% of all energy-related carbon dioxide emissions (GlobalABC 2018) and consumes 36% of the global final energy (IEA 2017). A rapid decarbonisation of the building sector is therefore needed to reach the 2 degree target set out in the Paris Agreement.

Better and more energy-efficient buildings help to reduce energy demand and greenhouse gas emissions and can even save money. They are also often more comfortable and healthy for its inhabitants.

Still, energy-efficient buildings are not the standard in most countries. Architects and engineers lack information about technologies and building design, and banks and investors are reluctant to invest. Rapid market transformation needs a redirection of investments towards energy-efficient buildings. Policies and building norms, as well as ambitious and actionable NDCs, are needed that reward energy-efficient design and send a strong signal to all players.

 

The central aim of the Paris Agreement is “to strengthen the global response to the threat of climate change by keeping a global temperature rise this century well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase even further to 1.5 degrees Celsius.” The agreement also aims at increasing the ability of countries to deal with the impacts of climate change, and at making finance flows consistent with a low GHG emissions and climate-resilient pathway.

The Paris Agreement requests each country to outline and communicate their post-2020 climate actions through Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and to raise the ambition of these efforts in the years ahead.

Most submitted NDCs still lack any substantial contributions to mitigation in buildings (UNEP. Global Status Report 2017). The current worldwide NDC ambitions, for example, only cover around 13% of the CO2 emissions of the global building sector. A strong effort is needed to expand upon the current country commitments and to transform the building sector in line with the goals of the Paris Agreement.

Reducing the energy demand in buildings and, thus, the buildings sector emissions, also contributes to achieving several of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set by the United Nations Development Programme. Above all, Goals 7: “Affordable and Clean Energy”, 9: “Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure”, 11: “Sustainable Cities and Communities” and 13: “Climate Action”.

As a primary goal and outcome of the Habitat III global summit which took place in Quito in October 2016, the UN member states agreed on the New Urban Agenda (NUA). The NUA promotes a "sustainable integrated urban development" in which, amongst other aspects, energy efficient and resilient buildings need to be embedded. 

Approach

PEEB combines financing for energy efficiency in large-scale projects with technical assistance through policy advice and expertise for building sector professionals.

ADVISORY

PEEB supports partner countries to improve their policies and standards.

  • Regulations and standards for sustainable buildings
  • Ambitious NDCs and implementation road maps
  • MRV systems for the building sector
  • Inter-institutional cooperation
EXPERTISE

PEEB fosters expertise among professionals in the private and public sector.

  • Planning of new buildings from design to construction and operation
  • Sustainable building materials, digital tools, efficent appliances and sustainable energy supply
  • Financing options and business models
FINANCE

PEEB mobilises innovative financing solutions for large building projects.

  • Feasibility studies and support with project development
  • Funding for energy efficiency in construction and renovation projects
  • Mobilising innovative climate financing from international and national resources



 

 

SERVICES

 

 

PEEB targets large construction projects, but also renovation projects. Hospitals, schools and commercial buildings as well as residential housing projects are the main focus. Financing concrete projects paired with support to enabling framework conditions and capacity-building allows for a replication and scaling-up of energy-efficient buildings.

 

IMPACT

 


PEEB PARTNER COUNTRIES

This map does not necessarily reflect the positions under international law of the governments of the donor countries or countries of implementation.

PEEB COUNTRIES
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